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SAPC Madingley Hall Conference 2017 - Primary Care at the Coalface: Mining for Diamonds

This year the Imperial College GP teaching team were responsible for organising and hosting the Society for Academic Primary Care (SAPC) regional conference held on 26th & 27th January in Madingley Hall, Cambridge. Each year, one of the five London medical schools takes on this honour. We would like to share some of the highlights from mixture of workshops, prizes, speakers, dinner and a quiz with you.

Dr David Hirsh and Dr Shivani Tanna
The first keynote address was by Associate Professor David Hirsh from Harvard Medical School, a world-renowned expert in educational transformation. He spoke passionately about the longitudinal integrated clerkships (LIC) he has been responsible for. He outlined research demonstrating erosion of medical student empathy over the course of a ‘traditional’ undergraduate curriculum, and offered LICs as a possible solution. Here, students learn from a panel of diverse patients, following them closely by attending hospital and GP appointments with them, developing meaningful relationships with them to aid their studies.
Dr Andy McKeown and Dr Ravi Parekh

Here at Imperial we are undertaking two variations of LIC, both at pilot stage: Year 3 Medicine in the Community Apprenticeship (MICA) and Year 5 Integrated Clinical Apprenticeship (ICA). Dr Andy McKeown, Dr Arabella Simpkin and Dr Ravi Parekh ran an interactive and engaging workshop to explore the evidence for this model of learning and to consider the practicalities of designing and delivering such a model.

A Dangerous Dragons session took place where presentations were made on novel ideas that challenged traditional educational arrangements or viewpoints. Chaired by Dr Jo Harris, the panel was made up by Professor Roger Jones (Editor of the BJGP), Dr Martin Lupton (Head of Undergraduate Medicine), Dr Sonia Saxena (Head of Child Health Unit at PCPH) and Dr David Hirsh. We heard from Dr Martin Block (Programme Director for the Imperial VTS) and Dr Graham Easton (GP and Medical journalist) on focused examinations in general practice, Dr Elizabeth Edwards (QMUL) on CigBreak, an app designed to help smokers quit, and from Dr Shivani Tanna (Imperial Yr 3 MICA course lead) who spoke passionately about her IMPACT-Q model, a method for helping students engage with the interpersonal aspects of patient consultations. Congratulations goes to Dr Shivani Tanna who won the Dangerous Dragons prize by wowing the panel with her idea.

A number of well received workshops and presentations were made from within the GP teaching team:

  • Dr Arti Maini and Dr Sonia Kumar - A health coaching training programme for medical students at Imperial College London. 
  • Dr Andy McKeown, Dr Ravi Parekh and Dr Sonia Kumar - Inspiring commissioners of the future: A unique teaching session for Year 5 medical students to learn about and experience commissioning in the NHS.
  • Dr Maham Stanyon, Ms Lisa Carrier, Dr Noreen Ryan and Dr Sonia Kumar - Virtual reality as a tool for learning in medicine; exploring the perceptions of medical students.
  • Dr Elizabeth Muir and Dr Melek Somai - CARE CAMPUS. Defining the future of Caregiving Education in Europe.
  • Dr Noreen Ryan, Dr Benedict Hayhoe and Dr Ben Clark - Expectations versus experiences: evaluation of learning outcomes from a student selected Palliative Care module in General Practice
  • Ms Giskin Day (Centre for Languages, Culture and Communication), Dr Ros Herbert and Dr Emma Metters ran a workshop on ‘Arts and Minds: using creative practice in the curriculum to enhance reflection, skills and knowledge’.

Madingley 2017 Diamond Dinner

Day 1 ended with a prosecco reception, a ‘diamond’ themed dinner and some excellent close-up magic. Fun and entertainment continued with a fabulous quiz devised by our very own Dr Jo Harris and Dr Andy McKeown, with special thanks to input from Dr Emma Keeling (Clinical Teaching Fellow currently on maternity leave).

Day 2 kicked off with a keynote address by Professor Neena Modi, President of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and Professor of Neonatal Medicine at Imperial. Her emphasis was on problems with social inequalities and the impact on child, and consequently adult health, making a strong case for the need to focus on child health.

All in all, a wonderful two days hearing about the latest in medical education and primary care based research and practice. A personal thanks goes to Miss Jenna Mollaney and Mr Ben Broglia for their hard work into making the event run smoothly! Following closing remarks by Dr Sonia Kumar and Professor Azeem Majeed, the baton was handed over to St George’s Medical School to organise the 2018 SAPC Madingley conference.

By Dr Anju Verma (Faculty Development Lead) and Ms Jo Horsburgh (Principal Teaching Fellow, EDU)


The grounds of Madingley Hall, Cambridge





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