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Showing posts from November, 2014

Dr Elizabeth Muir to lead a programme of work supporting Imperial College's School of Medicine’s ‘Year of Feedback’

Dr Elizabeth Muir has accepted an appointment to lead a programme of work supporting Imperial College's School of Medicine’s ‘Year of Feedback’. The purpose of this project is to identify and deliver improvements to the feedback provided to our students throughout the undergraduate Medicine programmes. Dr Muir is a Clinical Senior Lecturer in the Department of Primary Care and Public Health and a General Practitioner. She is also Theme Leader for Foundations of Clinical Practice and co-leads the Problem Based Learning teaching.

Arts-based Observational Skills Workshop in Dermatology

As part of the forthcoming Dermatology GP course for fifth year medical students a Imperial College London, we have developed an exciting and innovative workshop with the aim of improving students’ observation skills in dermatology using arts-based teaching. Dr Jamila Sherif gives an update on the aims of the workshop.

The arts can help us to slow perception, learn to look closely at the whole picture and see things anew. It is collaboration between arts-educators and medical educators, which in itself give rise to mutual learning and unique insights.

An arts-based approach to teach clinical observation skills has been integrated into some US medical schools for over a decade. A literature review identified papers that have evaluated student learning though art and proposed systematic observation of paintings can be used to aid development of visual observation skills. We have drawn on and developed this work, trying to design a session that focuses not only on visual but tactile perce…

Teaching Medical Students: A View from the Community:

Dr Beena Gohil Winner of the 2014 Year 5 GP Teacher of the Year Award gives her views about teaching medical students in Primary Care.

Introduction
I have been a GP since 2002 (following several years of indecision where I did a couple of years of hospital medicine, followed by anaesthetics before realising where I actually wanted to be!). I have always practised in the Ealing area of London, and have been in the same practice since 2002.

What inspired you to start teaching?
I was inspired to start teaching after hearing feedback from other teachers about how rewarding teaching medical students could be.

How does teaching fit in with your clinical practice?
Teaching year 5 students fits in reasonably well, as I ensure that I have blocks within the clinic session for whoever is teaching them, ensuring that the student has time to discuss the patient they have seen and to then discuss diagnoses and management. We discuss their timetable on day 1 and try to ensure that any outstanding learn…